Valor Partners Takes the ParityPledge™ as Part of Its Commitment to Improving the Pathway for Women in Leadership Positions
   
             

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      ROANOKE, VA  – 5/7/2018 – VALOR PARTNERS  , a boutique executive search firm specializing in enterprise and healthcare software,   has taken the ParityPledge™, building on its commitment to improving the pathway for women in leadership positions. The ParityPledge™ simply asks that companies commit to interviewing at least one qualified woman candidate for every open position, vice president and above, including the C-suite and board. No quotas. No deadlines. The ParityPledge™ is an initiative of  Parity.org , a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization focused on bringing gender equality to the highest levels of business.  "Parity.org’s mission aligns perfectly with the Valor Partners approach to executive search so joining forces was an easy decision.  Three years ago, we committed to making every effort to provide our clients with a gender-balanced candidate slate as part of our search process.  We are proud to lock arms with Cathrin and the other founding member companies who have taken the ParityPledge™ to promote the advancement of women." - Doug Johnson  “Parity.org was founded to correct the stark reality of gender imbalance at the very top of companies today,” said Cathrin Stickney, Parity.org founder and CEO. “While women represent 51 percent of the population, barely 20 percent of S&P500 corporate executive teams and boards are represented by women. We are thankful for organizations like Valor Partners that are willing to become a role model for change. We believe their public commitment and example will help us realize exponential progress toward reaching parity at the top.”  Organizations wanting to take the ParityPledge or learn more about how to get involved with Parity.org should visit  http://www.Parity.org .  “We’re tapping into an issue that so many companies are trying to get right. While much progress has been made at lower levels of organizations, the very top has remained elusive,” said Stickney. “We welcome all organizations – both big and small – that recognize the importance and benefits of a representative slate: a slate of candidates that reflects the population.”    About Parity.org   Parity.org is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to gender equality at the highest ranks of business leadership. Parity.org is assembling a founding advisory board of some of the most recognized men and women leaders in business. You can follow Parity.org on  LinkedIn  and  Twitter .   #parityPledge   ParityPledge™ is a trademark of Parity.org.

Valor Partners Takes the ParityPledge as Part of Its Commitment to Improving the Pathway for Women in Leadership Positions

“Parity.org was founded to correct the stark reality of gender imbalance at the very top of companies today,”

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Social Determinants of Health

Social Determinants of Health

Valor HeathTech Corner, featuring Healthify’s Manik Bhat: Social Determinants of Health

For this month’s installment of the Valor HealthTech Corner, I sat down with Healthify Co-founder and CEO Manik Bhat. Healthify is the leading the way when it comes Social Determinants of Health (SDoH)

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Valor HealthTech Corner, with CareCloud's Ken Comee

Valor HealthTech Corner, with CareCloud's Ken Comee

Valor HealthTech Corner, with CareCloud's Ken Comée

See what Ken Comée, CEO at Carecloud, has to say about today's dynamic Medical & Health Tech economy as well as what we can expect from CareCloud in 2018.

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     Disruptive Innovation Coming to Healthcare - Valor HealthTech Corner  Hello Valorians! We continue forward with Valor Health Tech Corner this week and hope you enjoyed our first installment on  Machine Learning as a Surrogate for Efficient Care . I’m pleased to introduce you to our next featured Executive, Mike McGuire, with Jellyfish Health. We plan to explore the emerging Medical Economy in the coming months, and Mike’s blog on “Disruptive Innovation Coming to Healthcare” is the tip of the spear. Enjoy!   - Drew Ramsey   Mike is the Chief Sales Officer at Jellyfish Health. He has over 35 years of experience building, managing, and selling successful healthcare information technology companies. Mike’s successful exits include the interface engine company that built Cloverleaf Healthcare.com to Quovadx. Mike helped Don French the owner of Vertisoft, LLC, an EMR company, sell the company to Optio Software. Mike also participated in selling Optio Software to Bottomline Technologies. All of those exits were valued at over $200M. Prior to joining G2 Works, Mike’s roles ranged from Regional Sales manager to VP of Sales to World-Wide VP of Sales to COO, and finally CEO. He’s worked in Fortune 500 companies’s IE., McAuto, McKesson HBOC, ACS, Allscripts to mid range companies like Healthcare .com and Optio Software down to start-ups like Vertisoft and Holon Solutions.  Disruptive Innovation Coming To Healthcare  Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen defines “disruptive innovation”, as the products or services that supplant incumbents because they are more convenient, more affordable, and more accessible. The process usually begins with a new player, targeting an overlooked portion of the market, and ends with redefining an entire industry. Think Uber… Are we in healthcare headed for just that scenario? With the election of 2016 now behind us, and a new administration headed to Washington, what should we or would we like to see emerge as the “new healthcare” model? I live in Dr. Tom Price’s congressional district, and have watched him evolve over the last 12 years as a staunch advocate of the doctor/patient being in the center of whatever our re-imagining system moves toward. I have a few suggestions for the good doctor.  If you go back to the definition of “disruptive innovation”, the concepts of convenience, and accessibility are part of that definition. These concepts are really about time, the doctors and mine. We humans have conquered space with our technological prowess. Time, however is different story. Time is finite; 60 seconds in a minute; 60 minutes in an hour; 24 hours in a day; 365 days in a non leap year. While we can’t make more time, we can certainly use it more efficiently. The disruption in healthcare will be around how everyone’s time is better utilized.  An article authored by Princeton economist Alan Kruger, which I recently read, states that the time patients spend getting healthcare should be reflected in the way we calculate health care expenditures. Time you spend interacting with the healthcare system could be used for other more productive and pleasurable activities. Kruger calculates that Americans over the age of 15 collectively spend 847 million hours waiting for medical services. If you count all health care related activities including time to travel, wait time, exam and treatment time, taking meds, obtaining medical care for others, and paying the bills associated- the average American spends 1.1 hours a week on health care. Folks like me, over 60, spend twice the time as those between the ages of 15 to 16. Women spend 80% more time on health care activities than men as they are more inclined to take care of the extended family.  Kruger claims that if we just value all peoples time at the average hourly wage of production and non-supervisory workers ($17.43), we Americans spend the equivalent of $240 billion on health care just in our time. If you do not include patient’s time we’re under counting by 11% the real cost of health care. Failing to account for this time makes our system look more productive than it actually is. The time that we spend seeking, receiving and paying for health care services is just as real as the other dollars spent.  So if time is money, how do I re-imagine the system to support these economic realities while understanding that the established patient/ doctor relationship has to fundamentally change? We have moved from the traditional medical model,  “What is the disease and how do I fix it”, to the current patient centered model, “What is my patient’s unique illness and how do I help them”. We now need to move toward an ecosystem health model where we ask, “Why is this patient here are how can I prevent others from having the same illness”. While the subtleties in approach may seem inconsequential, the impact is profound. When you include the local ecosystem, the aspect of the community you live in now comes into play. Like the old expression Tip O’Neill, former Speaker of the House use to use, “all politics are local”, even if the implications are national or international. Simple fact, so is healthcare. The new healthcare system has to be built from the ground up not from the top down.  The good news is that the infrastructure is in place; we have to re-align incentives (value vs. volume), and get a handle on the regulation regimen. This year some 20,000 pages will be enacted as law for the medical community at large, many overlapping and contradictory. The Stark laws alone make some forms of alternative payment approaches difficult if not impossible to implement. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), which represents the fix for how Physicians get paid for treating patients is 300 pages long. Right behind it followed 1000 pages of how CMS intends to implement the Act. I want my doctor treating me not trying to figure out how he or she’s going to get paid!  There’s an opportunity here if the folks in government at the federal, state and local level, can step back, and connect with the private sector. Unleashing the entrepreneurial spirit of business, both large and small can, and will make a difference in the speed of change. Unleashing doesn’t mean unbridled. That said, we’ve created more hurdles for transforming ideas into successful products. As a society, we have become risk averse. We Americans are pushing the frontiers of knowledge. And while our intellectual property is piling up, our productivity since the year 2000 is slipping.  In the Quality movement there’s an axiom that goes we need to FAIL FORWARD FASTER. Capital to succeed is not our issue. Our issue is can we get out of our own way? Can we overcome our need to be perfect with our need to be improving? Re-imagining our healthcare industry is not about ideology. Re-imagining is about putting the patient, the patient’s family, and the physician back in control of the healthcare decisions impacting lives regardless of income. A nation as rich as we are should settle for nothing less.           Mike McGuire   Mike is the Chief Sales Officer at Jellyfish Health. He has over 35 years of experience building, managing, and selling successful healthcare information technology companies. Mike’s successful exits include the interface engine company that built Cloverleaf Healthcare.com to Quovadx. Mike helped Don French the owner of Vertisoft, LLC, an EMR company, sell the company to Optio Software. Mike also participated in selling Optio Software to Bottomline Technologies. All of those exits were valued at over $200M. Prior to joining G2 Works, Mike’s roles ranged from Regional Sales manager to VP of Sales to World-Wide VP of Sales to COO, and finally CEO. He’s worked in Fortune 500 companies’s IE., McAuto, McKesson HBOC, ACS, Allscripts to mid range companies like Healthcare .com and Optio Software down to start-ups like Vertisoft and Holon Solutions.

Disruptive Innovation Coming to Healthcare - Valor HealthTech Corner

Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen defines “disruptive innovation”, as the products or services that supplant incumbents because they are more convenient, more affordable, and more accessible.

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     Machine Learning as a Surrogate for Efficient Care - Valor HealthTech Corner  For quite some time, we at Valor, have you been bringing you game-changing candidates and great career opportunities. In 2016, we began our efforts to support that work with news, tips, blog perspectives and updates on M&A activity around the industry. Today, we unveil our bi-weekly Healthcare blog feature, where we’ll bring you the latest and greatest ponderings and ideas, straight from the minds of the top Health IT/Software Execs in the industry.  Our first featured blogger is Steve Curd  https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevecurd/  , one of most successful and notable CEO’s our industry has known. Steve spent time as Technology and Information leader at organizations like CIGNA and United Health, before becoming COO at Healtheon/WebMD and leading the company through its IPO and 13 acquisition integrations. In recent years, Steve has been COO and CEO at leading innovators in and around the Healthcare Analytics and Precision Medicine world, including NantHealth, and most recently, Wanda/Oncoverse, where he commercialized and launched their Oncology Collaboration Platform.   Foreword by Drew Ramsey    Machine Learning as a Surrogate for Efficient Care   Among all advanced industrialized nations, the US stands alone. We have no uniform health system, no universal coverage, and have only recently legislated coverage for nearly all our citizens. Although with the new administration’s mantra of “repeal and replace,” even this is up in the air, leaving our Country’s amorphous hybrid healthcare system again in limbo. Perhaps this helps explain why the US spends over 16% of our GDP on healthcare ($8,700 per person), as compared to the industrialized nation average of 9%. Since decades of legislation have yet to close this $750 billion efficiency gap and with no systemic solution in sight, can machine learning help us to crack the efficiency code? Since most health information is now in digital form, and with significant recent advances in health analytics, our growing understanding of health and healthcare through the data will result in organic improvements in efficiency and in overall outcomes.  Let’s consider a few bellwether examples.   The Power of Health Analytics   At Wanda, we leveraged a decade of machine learning research from UCLA related to observing individuals with congestive heart failure, an extraordinarily expensive disease which has become the number one killer. By training the algorithm with minimal data from each of 1,500 individuals – blood pressure, heart rate, weight, and simple symptom information – a formal clinical trial demonstrated an ability to predict  90% of all hospitalizations  days prior to the adverse event. This enables an unprecedented ability to focus resources just on those people for whom an intervention is highly likely to eliminate that expensive hospitalization.  Here are a few other examples where machine learning is meaningfully improving efficiency and outcomes:   Precision medicine bio-marker discovery: as genomic and proteomic analysis uncovers the mutations and genetic predisposition for disease by sifting through patterns encoded within the 3 billion base pairs of the human genome, machine learning is an essential tool to accelerate discovery and correlation across massive data sets  Real-time patient risk stratification: care teams must continue to do more with less; machine learning can help focus expensive resources just on those patients most likely to be headed for an exacerbation. It has been shown that even simple daily activity patterns can become strong predictors of emerging health issues  Effectively dealing with sparse, missing and “spammy” data: physiologic data collection is fraught with invalid data points for a variety of reasons. Machine learning can reduce false positives, and fill in the blanks when necessary  Automated assessment of medical imaging: pattern and anomaly detection are ideal applications for machine learning techniques, to amplify diagnostic accuracy  Efficient, scalable parsing of clinical data: much health care data exists in the form of human language text; machine learning can help extract actionable insights from natural language to better inform the clinical team. Likewise, a droid which classifies and mines clinical literature can enable physicians to remain current and informed   There are few silver bullets in healthcare, however there has never been a time where analytics can have such a profound impact, with new examples emerging daily. By working smarter as opposed to harder, and armed by actionable insight provided through advanced analytics, we are learning that it is indeed possible to improve efficiency and diagnostic accuracy even in an uncoordinated and chaotic health “system.”           Steve Curd   Steve's career-long passion has been to accelerate the implementation of emerging science to improve health and patient outcomes while eliminating inefficiencies and avoidable costs. He is named as inventor on patents related to advanced image processing techniques, applying commercial aviation flight deck safety technologies in the operating room, and an innovative real-time wireless care team collaboration platform. Previously he served as the CIO of UnitedHealthCare, as COO of Healtheon / WebMD during its period of extraordinary growth, and has been the chief executive of innovative healthcare technology companies in the areas of electronic health records, surgical information systems, care team coordination, and personalized medicine focused on managing cancer. Having participated in 15 M&A transitions and an IPO, he has experience and strong competence in business integration, as well as driving organic growth.

Machine Learning as a Surrogate for Efficient Care - Valor HealthTech Corner

For quite some time, we at Valor, have you been bringing you game-changing candidates and great career opportunities. In 2016, we began our efforts to support that work with news, tips, blog perspectives and updates on M&A activity around the industry.

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