Valor Partners Takes the ParityPledge™ as Part of Its Commitment to Improving the Pathway for Women in Leadership Positions
   
             

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      ROANOKE, VA  – 5/7/2018 – VALOR PARTNERS  , a boutique executive search firm specializing in enterprise and healthcare software,   has taken the ParityPledge™, building on its commitment to improving the pathway for women in leadership positions. The ParityPledge™ simply asks that companies commit to interviewing at least one qualified woman candidate for every open position, vice president and above, including the C-suite and board. No quotas. No deadlines. The ParityPledge™ is an initiative of  Parity.org , a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization focused on bringing gender equality to the highest levels of business.  "Parity.org’s mission aligns perfectly with the Valor Partners approach to executive search so joining forces was an easy decision.  Three years ago, we committed to making every effort to provide our clients with a gender-balanced candidate slate as part of our search process.  We are proud to lock arms with Cathrin and the other founding member companies who have taken the ParityPledge™ to promote the advancement of women." - Doug Johnson  “Parity.org was founded to correct the stark reality of gender imbalance at the very top of companies today,” said Cathrin Stickney, Parity.org founder and CEO. “While women represent 51 percent of the population, barely 20 percent of S&P500 corporate executive teams and boards are represented by women. We are thankful for organizations like Valor Partners that are willing to become a role model for change. We believe their public commitment and example will help us realize exponential progress toward reaching parity at the top.”  Organizations wanting to take the ParityPledge or learn more about how to get involved with Parity.org should visit  http://www.Parity.org .  “We’re tapping into an issue that so many companies are trying to get right. While much progress has been made at lower levels of organizations, the very top has remained elusive,” said Stickney. “We welcome all organizations – both big and small – that recognize the importance and benefits of a representative slate: a slate of candidates that reflects the population.”    About Parity.org   Parity.org is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to gender equality at the highest ranks of business leadership. Parity.org is assembling a founding advisory board of some of the most recognized men and women leaders in business. You can follow Parity.org on  LinkedIn  and  Twitter .   #parityPledge   ParityPledge™ is a trademark of Parity.org.

Valor Partners Takes the ParityPledge as Part of Its Commitment to Improving the Pathway for Women in Leadership Positions

“Parity.org was founded to correct the stark reality of gender imbalance at the very top of companies today,”

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Social Determinants of Health

Social Determinants of Health

Valor HeathTech Corner, featuring Healthify’s Manik Bhat: Social Determinants of Health

For this month’s installment of the Valor HealthTech Corner, I sat down with Healthify Co-founder and CEO Manik Bhat. Healthify is the leading the way when it comes Social Determinants of Health (SDoH)

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Healthify Names Cesar Herrera VP of Client Services

Healthify Names Cesar Herrera VP of Client Services

Healthify Names Cesar Herrera VP of Client Services

February 26, 2018 - Cesar Herrera has joined Healthify as the new VP of Client Services. 
Cesar joins Healthify from ZocDoc where he was Head of Existing Business for Enterprise. He was responsible for overall retention and growth with Health Systems, in addition to leading product commercialization efforts with existing customers.

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Valor HealthTech Corner, with CareCloud's Ken Comee

Valor HealthTech Corner, with CareCloud's Ken Comee

Valor HealthTech Corner, with CareCloud's Ken Comée

See what Ken Comée, CEO at Carecloud, has to say about today's dynamic Medical & Health Tech economy as well as what we can expect from CareCloud in 2018.

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Healthify Names Jim Devlin VP of Sales

Healthify Names Jim Devlin VP of Sales

Healthify Names Jim Devlin VP of Sales

January 18, 2018- Jim Devlin has joined Healthify as the new VP of Sales. Jim is a high performing sales leader, responsible for direct sales of more than $250 million in revenue throughout the course of his career. Prior to joining Healthify Jim was the Area Vice President of the Phytel Business Unit at IBM Watson Health where he oversaw ...

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The Valor Podcast: Building companies and culture in todays’ tech market.

The Valor Podcast: Building companies and culture in todays’ tech market.

The Valor Podcast: Building Companies and Culture in Todays’ Tech Market.

Listen as we talk about how Greg has built his career from getting started at Chrysler to now being a 4-time software CEO.  Greg has seen a variety of situations- from the company that was in desperation mode to firing on all cylinders!

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Lucina Health Names Clint Reid Chief Revenue Officer

Lucina Health Names Clint Reid Chief Revenue Officer

Lucina Health Names Clint Reid Chief Revenue Officer

September 29, 2017 - Clint Reid has joined Lucina Health as the new Chief Revenue OfficerClint has an extensive 15+ years of Sales and Business Development Leadership experience in Health IT and Insurance. Prior to joining Lucina Clint was the EVP Sales at Altruista Health where he played a vital role in their 3 year growth from $2M to $23M. Clint has also had successful Sales Leadership stints with Medecision, United Healthcare and CIGNA.

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Building a Health IT Leadership Team | Drew Ramsey on the #HCBiz Show

Building a Health IT Leadership Team | Drew Ramsey on the #HCBiz Show

Building a Health IT Leadership Team | Drew Ramsey on the #HCBiz Show.

The #HCBiz Show sits down with Partner, Drew Ramsey to crack the code on building Leadership teams for Health IT startups

 

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Amplion Names Sherry Henricks as VP of Sales.

Amplion Names Sherry Henricks as VP of Sales.

Amplion Names Sherry Henricks as VP of Sales.

September 12, 2017 - Sherry Henricks has joined Amplion Clinical Communications as the VP of Sales. Prior to Amplion, Sherry was the SVP of Sales at Extension Healthcare and lead the company’s Sales and Business Development efforts through their acquisition by Vocera. Sherry’s prior experience includes Network Development & Strategy with LifeBridge Health as well as Sales & Business Development Leadership with Emergin (acquired by Philips Healthcare), Draeger and Siemens Medical.  

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Are Women Better Salespeople? We Asked 150 Software Sales Leaders- Here's What We Found...

Are Women Better Salespeople? We Asked 150 Software Sales Leaders- Here's What We Found...

Are Women Better Salespeople? We Asked 150 Software Sales Leaders- Here's What We Found...

We recently surveyed 150 VP of Sales in the Software/SaaS market. The focus of the survey was to learn about their experiences and thoughts about hiring and managing women. (It is worth noting that of the 150 sales leaders, the vast majority were men.)

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     What You Need To Do When You Decide To Drop Out Of A Job Interview  Original article found  here .  During a  long job search , it can seem ridiculous to  turn down an interview . Even when it’s obvious that a position is totally wrong for you, there are always reasons to see it through anyway. Sometimes you think you could use the  interview practice . Other times, you’re convinced that you’ll learn something about the company or the role itself that will change your mind.  The truth is that it’s perfectly fine to drop out if and when you realize you wouldn’t accept the job. But there are a few things you should do before (and after) you make the final call.   Don’t Rush The Decision   It’s easy to hear a couple things during the process that make you say, “Geez, this place sounds insane! I’d better run out of this room before they offer me this terrible job!” While you should pay attention to potential issues along the way (such as  these red flags ), it’s also important not to jump to conclusions based on one or two early-round interviews.  At this point, ask yourself why you’ve started considering dropping out. In my experience, there are two reasons people initially get to this point: they’ve either heard something that rubbed them the wrong way, or there’s something deeper (and more personal) going on.  If it’s the former, take advantage of any future interviews to discuss your concerns with the employer. But if it’s the latter, take it from me — reflect on your motivations for dropping out before you follow through on it. I once canceled an interview the morning I was supposed to meet with the hiring manager — all because I was afraid to try something new. In hindsight, that was immature of me and I wish I could take it back.   Find Someone You Trust And Ask For Their Feedback   A few years ago, I was going back and forth about a role I was interviewing for — and no matter what I did, I couldn’t figure out how I felt about the company or the job itself. A few things I heard were really exciting, but others made me want to rip my hair out.  There were a few conclusions that were easy to come to on my own, but eventually, I realized I needed to speak to someone I trusted about my situation.  For me, getting a chance to say the things I was thinking out loud to another human being was a great way for me to process all the information I had. It’s also a great way to answer a lot of the questions you have about fitting in at this potential organization. In my case, after I told someone about what I had learned about a particular company, she responded by saying, “Rich, you’d go insane at that job. Why are you even considering it?”   Let The Hiring Manager Know ASAP If You’re Pulling Out   Again, there’s nothing wrong with deciding that you don’t want a job that you haven’t finished interviewing for—but once you make that decision, don’t sit around.  And don’t overthink it! A simple email that doesn’t go into a whole lot of detail will suffice (seriously). With that said, if you think you’ll ever want to reach out to this person again or apply for a role a few years in the future, make sure to personalize it. Especially if you’re a few rounds in, multiple people have invested time in meeting with you and you want to leave the door open for any future opportunities.  Here’s a template you can use:   Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name],    Thanks so much for taking the time to consider me for the [position you’re interviewing for.] I’ve truly enjoyed meeting with you and discussing [a specific you spoke about]. However, I’ve decided to go in a different direction at this time.    I look forward to [seeing the product we discussed go live / continuing to follow the company’s success / watching the CEO speak at that conference / anything that would give you a reason to reach out in the future if needed.]    If you have any questions, please let me know.    Best,    [Your Name]   In an ideal world, you’d only go to interviews for jobs that you’d be excited to take. However, the reality is that you’ll probably end up sitting in conference rooms, talking about positions that don’t interest you right now. That’s OK!  Rather than writing off this interview as a worthless meeting, think of it instead as an opportunity. You not only got practice speaking to strangers (always valuable), but if you play your cards right, you might make a new connection in your field.

What You Need To Do When You Decide To Drop Out Of A Job Interview

During a long job search, it can seem ridiculous to turn down an interview. Even when it’s obvious that a position is totally wrong for you, there are always reasons to see it through anyway.

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     The 6 Hottest Startups in Health Care  Original article found  here .   Health care  presents one of the biggest opportunities for startups--as well as some of the biggest frustrations. The market size and the potential to make an impact in people's lives are nearly unrivaled, as is the level of regulation. Still, in 2016, venture investors poured  $12.2 billion into health care , backing companies that promise to change everything from  cancer care  to the process of  finding a new doctor . Here are some of the standouts.  1. Flatiron Health  Google Ventures-backed Flatiron Health has developed a cloud-based technology platform that's currently used by about 260 cancer clinics. The New York City startup takes the patient data it collects from those centers--without identifying details, of course--and shares it with pharmaceutical companies and researchers. The company raised an $8 million series A round in 2013. A little more than a year later, it raised $130 million, and a year after that, an additional $175 million, bringing its valuation to about $1.2 billion. Flatiron is one of fewer than a dozen billion-dollar-valuation "unicorn" companies in the health care space.  Major Investors: Google Ventures, First Round Capital, Roche, Allen & Co.   2. Freenome   Freenome, headquartered in South San Francisco, is one of a slew of so-called liquid biopsy (i.e., blood test) companies to break out over the past few years. The goal is to use a patient's DNA, rather than a tissue sample, to diagnose cancer. Freenome says its tests do better than the current options for diagnosing prostate, breast, colorectal, and lung cancers. The company is using a $65 million round of funding, led by Andreessen Horowitz, to head into clinical trials.  Major investors: Andreessen Horowitz, Founders Fund, Charles River Associates   3. Clover Health   Another health care unicorn, Clover Health is an insurance start-up aiming to use data science to improve preventive medicine. The San Francisco-based company tracks dozens of clinical and social data points to help elderly and low-income patients avoid hospital visits. It currently handles claims for about 25,000 Medicare Advantage patients in New Jersey. With a recent $130 million funding round from Google Ventures and other backers, Clover plans to expand, and begin operations in three more states by this fall.  Major investors: First Round Capital, Sequoia Capital, Greenoaks Capital   4. Zocdoc   New York City-based Zocdoc allows users to find in-network health care providers, book appointments online, and read reviews from other patients. About 6 million patients in the U.S. use the service each month. Providers pay a subscription fee to be listed, and then Zocdoc integrates with their practice management software. Zocdoc recently added a feature that lets patients type in their symptoms using natural language and then matches them with an appropriate provider, such as a doctor, dentist, nurse practitioner, or physical therapist. The company has raised a total of $223 million.  Major investors: Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Khosla Ventures, Goldman Sachs   5. 23andMe   In 2013, the FDA ruled that genetic-testing company 23andMe, which has raised a total of $233 million, could no longer sell one of its signature services: test results that indicate a person's propensity to develop inherited diseases. Since then, Mountain View, California's 23andMe has mainly been using its genetic testing services to provide information about ancestry and origin. But in April of this year, the company finally won FDA approval to sell direct-to-consumer tests that provide genetic health risk information for conditions such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and hereditary thrombophilia.  Major investors: Google Ventures, New Enterprise Associates, WuXi Healthcare Ventures   6. Babylon Health   London-based Babylon Health, which has raised a total of $85 million, started as a telemedicine company, enabling doctors to make diagnoses via video and allowing patients to rate the quality of each interaction. But it's received more notice lately for another program it's piloting in the U.K.: an AI-powered chatbot that analyzes a patient's condition against a database of symptoms, while incorporating the patient's own medical history and responses to the chatbot's questions.  Major investors: Vostok New Ventures, Hoxton Ventures, Mustafa Suleyman

The 6 Hottest Startups in Health Care

Health care presents one of the biggest opportunities for startups--as well as some of the biggest frustrations. The market size and the potential to make an impact in people's lives are nearly unrivaled, as is the level of regulation.

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      How Your Startup Can Harness The Power of Social Media   Original article posted  here .  Thank goodness we don’t have to rely on mailers and word-of-mouth to market our businesses anymore. Now, thanks to social media, business owners can advertise their services and interact with customers with just the click of a mouse or the touch of a screen. Social media for startups has loads of benefits. It increases brand awareness, creates a meaningful connection with customers, and offers the opportunity to reach a wider audience. My first year in business, I received 85 percent of clients based on incoming requests generated from my LinkedIn profile.  How can you harness the power of social media to market your startup like a boss? It’s easy. Just follow these guidelines:  ADVERTISING    Know your audience.  What better way to learn more about your target audience, their likes and dislikes, than by engaging with them using social media for startup? And, once you get a handle on who your customers are, you can tailor your posts to be more relevant to them. I treat every Instagram post as a science experiment: I'm constantly tweaking my posting algorithm so that I focus on posts with the most engagement.   Engage, engage, engage!  Think about it. Wouldn't you be more inclined to frequent a business if their social media team jumped to answer questions or post relevant comments on social media? The companies with the most successful social media presence are the ones that engage with their customers. Some businesses, such as Nike, even have social media accounts specifically for  customer support .   Keep it current.  Post frequently. Link to interesting news stories in your field. Share memes that are relevant to your audience. Stay up on trends so you can talk about what’s going viral right now. People love when they have insight into your life. As such, the current posts always get a great deal of engagement.   Direct traffic to your website.  Use your social media accounts to direct traffic to your website by placing appropriate links in your posts. Advertise those products and services so you can get more customers! The best way to advertise is through your bio at the end of your posts. Targeted bios have helped my business immensely.   Hashtag your heart out.  Use hashtags to engage with users and widen your audience. Search your startup’s name on social media to see what people are talking about. Use those questions, comments and complaints to your advantage. I personally keep groups of thirty hashtags to use for different kinds of posts in a note file on my phone. This makes it easier to quickly add the right hashtags.   Get everyone on board.  Use your employees’ networks to your startup’s benefit by getting everyone on your team involved in social media marketing. This is a great time to use that elevator pitch. Maintain consistency by having your team use the same pitch or taglines, then sit back and watch your business network expand.   Look into crowdspeaking.  For an extra boost, try  crowdspeaking  -- sharing one message across multiple accounts. With crowdspeaking, you can get your message out from multiple users on multiple platforms, all at once.   Focus on your best platform.  It’s all about knowing yourself and using your strengths to your company’s advantage – even when it comes to social media for startups. So, if you’re a wiz at snapping artsy photos, focus your efforts on Instagram. If you have a gift for writing in 140 characters or less, Twitter is your best marketing friend. Go ahead and use all the other platforms, but focus most of your social media marketing on the platform where you most excel. My two favorite platforms are Instagram and LinkedIn. Both offer unique opportunities to connect and engage fellow entrepreneurs and/or consumers. Instagram is an ideal way to tell stories about yourself, your company or your products and services. LinkedIn gives insights into your business and lets you connect with others in the industry or complementary industries. LinkedIn is also a powerful way to establish yourself as an expert in your field. Creating the right profile is an excellent way to showcase your abilities.   Use social media tools.  Work smarter with social media tools like  Hootsuite  or  IFTT . Both services allow you to simultaneously post your message via Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms.   Use your natural voice.  When using social media for startups, write your posts in the same way that you would speak. Skip the stuffiness by writing conversationally. It makes all the difference when your audience knows that there’s a real person on the other side of the screen.   Above all, have fun with social media. Remember those Poo-Pourri commercials that went viral on Facebook last year? Now,  there’s  a company that knows how to use social media for marketing. Who knows? Maybe your startup will be the next viral hit!

How Your Startup Can Harness The Power of Social Media

Thank goodness we don't have to rely on mailers and word-of-mouth to market our businesses anymore. Now, thanks to social media, business owners can advertise their services and interact with customers with just the click of a mouse of the touch of a screen.

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Growing The Female Ladder To Success Within Your Organization.

Growing The Female Ladder To Success Within Your Organization.

Growing The Female Ladder To Success Within Your Organization.

In today’s high-powered business world, women make up nearly half the workforce* but when it comes to holding top management positions – men outnumber the women significantly

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Honeywell Aerospace names Brandon Van Atta as Senior Technical Sales Manager- Propulsion

Honeywell Aerospace names Brandon Van Atta as Senior Technical Sales Manager- Propulsion

Honeywell Aerospace names Brandon Van Atta as Senior Technical Sales Manager- Propulsion

Brandon Van Atta joins Honeywell Aerospace in May of 2017 with over 18 years of aviation experience. Prior to joining Honeywell, Brandon was the Business Development Manager (Engines) for Columbia Helicopters Inc.

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     Disruptive Innovation Coming to Healthcare - Valor HealthTech Corner  Hello Valorians! We continue forward with Valor Health Tech Corner this week and hope you enjoyed our first installment on  Machine Learning as a Surrogate for Efficient Care . I’m pleased to introduce you to our next featured Executive, Mike McGuire, with Jellyfish Health. We plan to explore the emerging Medical Economy in the coming months, and Mike’s blog on “Disruptive Innovation Coming to Healthcare” is the tip of the spear. Enjoy!   - Drew Ramsey   Mike is the Chief Sales Officer at Jellyfish Health. He has over 35 years of experience building, managing, and selling successful healthcare information technology companies. Mike’s successful exits include the interface engine company that built Cloverleaf Healthcare.com to Quovadx. Mike helped Don French the owner of Vertisoft, LLC, an EMR company, sell the company to Optio Software. Mike also participated in selling Optio Software to Bottomline Technologies. All of those exits were valued at over $200M. Prior to joining G2 Works, Mike’s roles ranged from Regional Sales manager to VP of Sales to World-Wide VP of Sales to COO, and finally CEO. He’s worked in Fortune 500 companies’s IE., McAuto, McKesson HBOC, ACS, Allscripts to mid range companies like Healthcare .com and Optio Software down to start-ups like Vertisoft and Holon Solutions.  Disruptive Innovation Coming To Healthcare  Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen defines “disruptive innovation”, as the products or services that supplant incumbents because they are more convenient, more affordable, and more accessible. The process usually begins with a new player, targeting an overlooked portion of the market, and ends with redefining an entire industry. Think Uber… Are we in healthcare headed for just that scenario? With the election of 2016 now behind us, and a new administration headed to Washington, what should we or would we like to see emerge as the “new healthcare” model? I live in Dr. Tom Price’s congressional district, and have watched him evolve over the last 12 years as a staunch advocate of the doctor/patient being in the center of whatever our re-imagining system moves toward. I have a few suggestions for the good doctor.  If you go back to the definition of “disruptive innovation”, the concepts of convenience, and accessibility are part of that definition. These concepts are really about time, the doctors and mine. We humans have conquered space with our technological prowess. Time, however is different story. Time is finite; 60 seconds in a minute; 60 minutes in an hour; 24 hours in a day; 365 days in a non leap year. While we can’t make more time, we can certainly use it more efficiently. The disruption in healthcare will be around how everyone’s time is better utilized.  An article authored by Princeton economist Alan Kruger, which I recently read, states that the time patients spend getting healthcare should be reflected in the way we calculate health care expenditures. Time you spend interacting with the healthcare system could be used for other more productive and pleasurable activities. Kruger calculates that Americans over the age of 15 collectively spend 847 million hours waiting for medical services. If you count all health care related activities including time to travel, wait time, exam and treatment time, taking meds, obtaining medical care for others, and paying the bills associated- the average American spends 1.1 hours a week on health care. Folks like me, over 60, spend twice the time as those between the ages of 15 to 16. Women spend 80% more time on health care activities than men as they are more inclined to take care of the extended family.  Kruger claims that if we just value all peoples time at the average hourly wage of production and non-supervisory workers ($17.43), we Americans spend the equivalent of $240 billion on health care just in our time. If you do not include patient’s time we’re under counting by 11% the real cost of health care. Failing to account for this time makes our system look more productive than it actually is. The time that we spend seeking, receiving and paying for health care services is just as real as the other dollars spent.  So if time is money, how do I re-imagine the system to support these economic realities while understanding that the established patient/ doctor relationship has to fundamentally change? We have moved from the traditional medical model,  “What is the disease and how do I fix it”, to the current patient centered model, “What is my patient’s unique illness and how do I help them”. We now need to move toward an ecosystem health model where we ask, “Why is this patient here are how can I prevent others from having the same illness”. While the subtleties in approach may seem inconsequential, the impact is profound. When you include the local ecosystem, the aspect of the community you live in now comes into play. Like the old expression Tip O’Neill, former Speaker of the House use to use, “all politics are local”, even if the implications are national or international. Simple fact, so is healthcare. The new healthcare system has to be built from the ground up not from the top down.  The good news is that the infrastructure is in place; we have to re-align incentives (value vs. volume), and get a handle on the regulation regimen. This year some 20,000 pages will be enacted as law for the medical community at large, many overlapping and contradictory. The Stark laws alone make some forms of alternative payment approaches difficult if not impossible to implement. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), which represents the fix for how Physicians get paid for treating patients is 300 pages long. Right behind it followed 1000 pages of how CMS intends to implement the Act. I want my doctor treating me not trying to figure out how he or she’s going to get paid!  There’s an opportunity here if the folks in government at the federal, state and local level, can step back, and connect with the private sector. Unleashing the entrepreneurial spirit of business, both large and small can, and will make a difference in the speed of change. Unleashing doesn’t mean unbridled. That said, we’ve created more hurdles for transforming ideas into successful products. As a society, we have become risk averse. We Americans are pushing the frontiers of knowledge. And while our intellectual property is piling up, our productivity since the year 2000 is slipping.  In the Quality movement there’s an axiom that goes we need to FAIL FORWARD FASTER. Capital to succeed is not our issue. Our issue is can we get out of our own way? Can we overcome our need to be perfect with our need to be improving? Re-imagining our healthcare industry is not about ideology. Re-imagining is about putting the patient, the patient’s family, and the physician back in control of the healthcare decisions impacting lives regardless of income. A nation as rich as we are should settle for nothing less.           Mike McGuire   Mike is the Chief Sales Officer at Jellyfish Health. He has over 35 years of experience building, managing, and selling successful healthcare information technology companies. Mike’s successful exits include the interface engine company that built Cloverleaf Healthcare.com to Quovadx. Mike helped Don French the owner of Vertisoft, LLC, an EMR company, sell the company to Optio Software. Mike also participated in selling Optio Software to Bottomline Technologies. All of those exits were valued at over $200M. Prior to joining G2 Works, Mike’s roles ranged from Regional Sales manager to VP of Sales to World-Wide VP of Sales to COO, and finally CEO. He’s worked in Fortune 500 companies’s IE., McAuto, McKesson HBOC, ACS, Allscripts to mid range companies like Healthcare .com and Optio Software down to start-ups like Vertisoft and Holon Solutions.

Disruptive Innovation Coming to Healthcare - Valor HealthTech Corner

Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen defines “disruptive innovation”, as the products or services that supplant incumbents because they are more convenient, more affordable, and more accessible.

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Apervita Names David Shreiner as Senior Vice President of Sales

Apervita Names David Shreiner as Senior Vice President of Sales

Apervita Names David Shreiner as Senior Vice President of Sales

March 15, 2017 - David Shreiner joined Apervita in March of 2017 with over 10 years of leadership and sales experience. Prior to joining Apervita, David was the Vice President of Sales at Imprivata. He also served as VP of Sales and National VP of Sales at Carefusion.

David received his undergraduate degree from Miami University in Business, Marketing/Economics.

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     Hire Better (Psst- The Questions You Need To Ask Early)  I was speaking with a client yesterday about a position they are trying to fill. I was baffled by what I was being told; it made no sense to me. It was a story of wasting time and money and of sloppy, disjointed interview process. It was all completely preventable (and should have been).  The gist of what I’m about to talk about is how to dramatically reduce wasting time and money in the recruiting, interview and hiring process.   The story:   This client is a company that I have been working with for about six months. They made it very clear when we first came together that that they would call me only when they had exhausted all their other options. Something I appreciated.  Well, they called about four weeks ago. They had two immediate needs for a highly-specialized profile. The candidates they needed are hard to find and are rarely unemployed. Lucky for this client, I have worked in their space for 15 years and knew several people who fit the described profile. I expected that I would have candidates quickly, maybe not a lot but some. I did. Within three days, I had talked with five strong candidates; three were not available or not interested, two were. I was excited to call the client to let them know.   When I called my client just a few days after the initial call to kick off the search, I was informed that they already had four “great” candidates. In three days. I was blown away- and impressed- with that profile? Four great candidates in three days? Wow!  They asked me to call back in a few weeks to see what happened. If they couldn’t land any of their candidates, they would “definitely want to talk to my candidates.”    Fast forward to yesterday when I called to get that update. They had conducted multiple phone interviews with all four candidates and had flown in not one, not two, not three but all four to meet with the sales and marketing leaders. Two were quickly eliminated from consideration. The other two were both going to be made offers. However, the client told me that they didn’t expect either to accept the offer because there are circumstances with their current employers and neither could leave. They were also not certain either candidate would actually accept the offer terms even if those circumstances didn’t exist.  Huh?   First, two should have never been flown in. The candidates who were quickly eliminated in the face-to-face interviews should have been eliminated at the phone interview phase.  Second, the other two should have never been flown in without knowing about their ability and willingness to leave their current, respective employers immediately.   Third, assuming they would leave, the money should have been qualified in advance of the face-to-face interview ever being arranged or taking place.  Last and perhaps most importantly, someone (maybe several someones) are not competent to do their job, are afraid to do it well or value not hurting someone's feelings over wasting loads of time and resources. Either the hiring manager can't evaluate the skills of the people he is there to hire and manage or the recruiter doesn't understand his job OR the job he is evaluating to determine qualified or not, perhaps both.   QUESTION ON THAT LAST POINT - Should I bring that to the attention to senior leadership at my client? If you were/are the CEO or VP of HR, would you want your recruiting partner to point that out to you? There are risks and rewards both ways. Let me know what you think.   This client engaged candidates who were not really candidates at all. In the process, they wasted the hours of time and thousands of dollars on travel, hotel and other interview related expenses.   Further, the opportunity cost to the interview team has been significant. All the time they invested in this interview goat rodeo could have been focused on clients, closing new business, developing existing team members or doing their regular job. Instead, they get to start this whole process all over again. It’s a total joke and it was all completely avoidable.  The problem is that most candidates are only "qualified" on a single dimension, 'what looks like the ability to do the job' dimension. Things like: has the person worked with the right companies, had the right titles, had the right responsibilities and/or done the right kind of work. Those are the things that get the candidate into the process and for most companies, it is unfortunately where the qualifying stops.  Candidates need to be continually qualified not just on their seeming ability to do the job but on multiple other dimensions as well. Arm your recruiters with these questions and strategies to avoid the same mistake my client just made (and you'll save yourself some heartache along the way as well):   After every interview, even the initial phone interview, the candidate needs to be asked this question, “Based on what you have learned in this conversation, are you interested in this job?" and the all important follow-up question, "Why?"  Before the first interview, money should be discussed. This is not a negotiation but someone needs to know if the candidate is in the compensation range. If the candidate is reluctant to discuss specifics, then the recruiter should reveal the range to the candidate. “We have a salary range of $140k-$160k for this position. If this continues to go well, would you accept a salary in that range?” Then shut up and listen.   Ask: “How many companies are you interviewing with?” You want to know what your competition looks like and if you really want to do yourself a favor, ask where you rank in that interview stack (and explore what would improve your position in that stack). If the odds are against you, put your ego in your hip pocket and go after the candidate that will love you back!  Ask what  really  matters to the candidate. This is critically important, especially for the candidate that has been recruited and has not come to you because he/she is unemployed or miserable. People want to join companies where it is a reciprocal relationship- where they give their time and expertise to a company and in return get paid, yes, but also get to learn, grow or expand their skills or experience and ultimately their career. People want to matter and they want to work where they feel like they will. Simply asking them what is important to them at the beginning of an interview process is a simple, subtle and profoundly powerful way to demonstrate to a candidate that they do matter.  Do not underestimate the power of this question .  Ask, “Why is this opportunity better than what you have today?” They better have a great answer. If they don’t, move on. Or you’d get better at thrilling with your opportunity.   Those are all questions that need to be asked early and often in the interview process (don’t make the mistake of only asking once- you need to ask after every interview- I can’t tell you how many times candidates will get a raise or promotion in the middle of my interview processes-ugh).  The ability to do the job is easy to qualify. Your ability to actually acquire the talents of your top candidates who can do the job is something entirely different. Qualifying on multiple dimensions will help.  Good luck. Feel free to reach out to me if you have questions or comments (and please answer to the question I posed if you have a second- I'm interested in your two cents). 

Hire Better (Psst- The Questions You Need To Ask Early)

I was speaking with a client yesterday about a position they are trying to fill. I was baffled by what I was being told; it made no sense to me. It was a story of wasting time and money and of sloppy, disjointed interview process. It was all completely preventable (and should have been).

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     Machine Learning as a Surrogate for Efficient Care - Valor HealthTech Corner  For quite some time, we at Valor, have you been bringing you game-changing candidates and great career opportunities. In 2016, we began our efforts to support that work with news, tips, blog perspectives and updates on M&A activity around the industry. Today, we unveil our bi-weekly Healthcare blog feature, where we’ll bring you the latest and greatest ponderings and ideas, straight from the minds of the top Health IT/Software Execs in the industry.  Our first featured blogger is Steve Curd  https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevecurd/  , one of most successful and notable CEO’s our industry has known. Steve spent time as Technology and Information leader at organizations like CIGNA and United Health, before becoming COO at Healtheon/WebMD and leading the company through its IPO and 13 acquisition integrations. In recent years, Steve has been COO and CEO at leading innovators in and around the Healthcare Analytics and Precision Medicine world, including NantHealth, and most recently, Wanda/Oncoverse, where he commercialized and launched their Oncology Collaboration Platform.   Foreword by Drew Ramsey    Machine Learning as a Surrogate for Efficient Care   Among all advanced industrialized nations, the US stands alone. We have no uniform health system, no universal coverage, and have only recently legislated coverage for nearly all our citizens. Although with the new administration’s mantra of “repeal and replace,” even this is up in the air, leaving our Country’s amorphous hybrid healthcare system again in limbo. Perhaps this helps explain why the US spends over 16% of our GDP on healthcare ($8,700 per person), as compared to the industrialized nation average of 9%. Since decades of legislation have yet to close this $750 billion efficiency gap and with no systemic solution in sight, can machine learning help us to crack the efficiency code? Since most health information is now in digital form, and with significant recent advances in health analytics, our growing understanding of health and healthcare through the data will result in organic improvements in efficiency and in overall outcomes.  Let’s consider a few bellwether examples.   The Power of Health Analytics   At Wanda, we leveraged a decade of machine learning research from UCLA related to observing individuals with congestive heart failure, an extraordinarily expensive disease which has become the number one killer. By training the algorithm with minimal data from each of 1,500 individuals – blood pressure, heart rate, weight, and simple symptom information – a formal clinical trial demonstrated an ability to predict  90% of all hospitalizations  days prior to the adverse event. This enables an unprecedented ability to focus resources just on those people for whom an intervention is highly likely to eliminate that expensive hospitalization.  Here are a few other examples where machine learning is meaningfully improving efficiency and outcomes:   Precision medicine bio-marker discovery: as genomic and proteomic analysis uncovers the mutations and genetic predisposition for disease by sifting through patterns encoded within the 3 billion base pairs of the human genome, machine learning is an essential tool to accelerate discovery and correlation across massive data sets  Real-time patient risk stratification: care teams must continue to do more with less; machine learning can help focus expensive resources just on those patients most likely to be headed for an exacerbation. It has been shown that even simple daily activity patterns can become strong predictors of emerging health issues  Effectively dealing with sparse, missing and “spammy” data: physiologic data collection is fraught with invalid data points for a variety of reasons. Machine learning can reduce false positives, and fill in the blanks when necessary  Automated assessment of medical imaging: pattern and anomaly detection are ideal applications for machine learning techniques, to amplify diagnostic accuracy  Efficient, scalable parsing of clinical data: much health care data exists in the form of human language text; machine learning can help extract actionable insights from natural language to better inform the clinical team. Likewise, a droid which classifies and mines clinical literature can enable physicians to remain current and informed   There are few silver bullets in healthcare, however there has never been a time where analytics can have such a profound impact, with new examples emerging daily. By working smarter as opposed to harder, and armed by actionable insight provided through advanced analytics, we are learning that it is indeed possible to improve efficiency and diagnostic accuracy even in an uncoordinated and chaotic health “system.”           Steve Curd   Steve's career-long passion has been to accelerate the implementation of emerging science to improve health and patient outcomes while eliminating inefficiencies and avoidable costs. He is named as inventor on patents related to advanced image processing techniques, applying commercial aviation flight deck safety technologies in the operating room, and an innovative real-time wireless care team collaboration platform. Previously he served as the CIO of UnitedHealthCare, as COO of Healtheon / WebMD during its period of extraordinary growth, and has been the chief executive of innovative healthcare technology companies in the areas of electronic health records, surgical information systems, care team coordination, and personalized medicine focused on managing cancer. Having participated in 15 M&A transitions and an IPO, he has experience and strong competence in business integration, as well as driving organic growth.

Machine Learning as a Surrogate for Efficient Care - Valor HealthTech Corner

For quite some time, we at Valor, have you been bringing you game-changing candidates and great career opportunities. In 2016, we began our efforts to support that work with news, tips, blog perspectives and updates on M&A activity around the industry.

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     A Headhunter’s Secret To Being A Great Candidate  Everyone, no matter their industry or level of position goes through the interview process. All of us are, at some point, candidates.  You might think there are magic interview bullets that apply to CEOs or vice presidents that don’t apply to the rest of us. That isn’t true. As a matter of fact, the basics of interviewing are just that, basics. For most jobs and positions, the basics will not only advance you through the process but will get you an offer. Most people suck at the basics.     Here are some thoughts on how to be great at the basics, and some things that will take you beyond the simple steps and make you stand out in your next interview.   Your Phone Interview   The first call isn’t really an interview but more of a two-way conversation. At least it should be.  The first call is a chance for you to understand more about the company and the opportunity. If you are working elsewhere, it is important that you make clear to the person on the call with you that you have a job (and that you don’t need one) without coming across as cocky or uninterested.  You want to make it incumbent on the interviewer, right from the start, to show you a better opportunity than the one you have today. So, you still want to come off as flattered and intrigued by the company being interested in you, but you also want to make clear this is a two-way street. Set the tone that you are open to a better opportunity. The purpose of this first call is to determine if this could be that better opportunity.   Are you really ready to make a change?   If you like what you hear in that exploratory call, you need to get serious. Go look in the mirror and ask yourself if you are ready to make a change? If you aren’t, graciously bow out.   Don’t just stop communicating or stop returning calls or emails . Ideally, pick up the phone (yes, I said pick up the  phone ) and tell whoever it was you were talking to that the timing or fit isn’t right. Position yourself as the one that got away in your interviewer’s eyes. Leave the door open to be able to call them back when you are really ready to make a career change.   Ready? On To Step Two!   If you decide to move forward, here are some critical (and easy) winning strategies.   Time To Win The Job   First, get your head right. Regardless of your track record, company you're with, or the credentials you possess, this is where you tuck your ego in your hip pocket. When you decide to engage, you are making the conscious decision to do so.  This is now about you demonstrating why you are the best choice for this position.  This is about you winning the job and getting your offer.   Step 1 - Get Prepared   Do your homework on the interviewer(s), the company and the product or service offerings. This is the place where most people blow their chances; and it happens all the time. The number one reason I hear for people getting knocked out of the interview process is that they weren’t prepared.  I hate hearing comments from interviewers like:  “The candidate couldn’t tell me about the company or what we do.”  “He didn’t know anything about my background.”, etc.  It is just so preventable!  This background research isn’t hard, it just takes some time. Google the company, read some press releases, use LinkedIn to learn about your interviewer’s background, etc. All the while, make note of things you can interject into your interview conversations.    Reference press releases, current company news, where people went to school, or other details that are relevant to your conversation. A mention like, “In Industry Journal X (name the article) you said, ‘______’”, can be very powerful in your interview.  Most people think prep work is done solely to demonstrate you prepared and did your homework for the interview.    This is true, but more importantly, it demonstrates you care and illustrates this is important to you. Far fewer people prepare for interviews than you might think. If you’re one of the few, you’re already ahead of your competition.     Step 2 - Show Some Common Courtesy   Be gracious and appreciative. I wrote an article awhile back about  the lack of courtesy people demonstrate toward each other these days . I absolutely encourage all my candidates to write a thank you note after an interview. I encourage my clients to do the same.  No one is going to get a job because they write a nice thank you note, BUT lots of people stop being considered for jobs because they don’t.  It doesn’t take that long, you can write a simple email (though a handwritten note is very well received, unless you have horrible handwriting in which case go with email).   Step 3- Close For The Job   Clients want to hire candidates who actually want the job. Tell your interviewer you want the job.  Talk about why you are the best choice.  Don’t be shy here.  You want to put yourself in the position to be able to say “yes” or “no” and to do that you need to get the offer.  Remember, you can always say “no”.   The Important Stuff (I’ve Saved The Best For Last)   These are difference-making questions you  really  need to be prepared for should they come up. (These questions fall into the “know thyself” category.)   What makes you really good OR what are you best at OR what is your greatest value add? (This is you talking about your personal value proposition.)  These are all versions of the same question and you need to know the answer.  This is you not only knowing yourself but also how you articulate and talk about yourself. I’ve found this can be a more challenging question for women who tend to not take credit for their work or point out their personal contribution when it is meaningful and significant. This is the place where you have an opportunity to demonstrate confidence and contribution. You need to do this well. Your confidence, here, will actually instill confidence in your interviewer choosing you.    Do you know what we do OR do you know what our value proposition is?  I see this question a lot. They are asking if you did your homework. No one will expect a perfect answer but you need to be in the ballpark.    Can you talk about the competition? (I’m asking you)  This is your chance to ask about them and demonstrate again, in a different way, that you have done your homework. Want a tip on how to find who the competitors are?  Google “[name of the company] competitors”. [Viola!]     It does truly take some work to get a new job, but if you take the time to think through what you want, do the research on the companies where you could make a difference, and prepare to dive into the conversation, all that work will be worth the opportunity to do new and hopefully far better things in your new position.

A Headhunter’s Secret To Being A Great Candidate

Everyone, no matter their industry or level of position goes through the interview process. All of us are, at some point, candidates.

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